What is Placenta Accreta Spectrum?
Urology

What is Placenta Accreta Spectrum?

    What is Placenta Accreta Spectrum?

    Placenta Accreta Spectrum (PAS) is a term used to describe a group of obstetric complications where the placenta (the organ that nourishes the developing fetus during pregnancy) becomes abnormally attached to the uterus. In PAS, the placenta can become embedded too deeply into the uterine wall, making it difficult to detach after delivery.

    There are three types of PAS, which are differentiated by the degree of placental attachment:

    Placenta accreta: the placenta attaches too deeply into the uterine lining.

    Placenta increta: the placenta grows into the uterine muscle.

    Placenta percreta: the placenta grows through the uterine wall and can invade nearby organs, such as the bladder.

    PAS is a serious condition that can cause life-threatening bleeding during delivery and can lead to the need for a hysterectomy (removal of the uterus). Women who have had previous cesarean deliveries, placenta previa, or other uterine surgeries are at higher risk for developing PAS. Early detection and management of PAS are important for the health and safety of both the mother and the baby.

    What is Placenta Previa

    Placenta previa is a complication of pregnancy where the placenta implants low in the uterus and partially or completely covers the cervix (the opening of the uterus that leads to the birth canal). This can result in bleeding during pregnancy or labor, which can be serious and require emergency medical attention.

    There are three main types of placenta previa:

    Complete placenta previa: the placenta completely covers the cervix.

    Partial placenta previa: the placenta partially covers the cervix.

    Marginal placenta previa: the placenta is located at the edge of the cervix.

    Placenta previa is usually diagnosed through ultrasound, and women who are diagnosed with placenta previa may be advised to have a cesarean delivery to avoid bleeding during labor. In some cases, the placenta may move away from the cervix as the uterus grows, allowing for a vaginal delivery. However, if the placenta continues to cover the cervix or is located very low in the uterus, a cesarean delivery will likely be necessary.

    Women who have had previous cesarean deliveries, multiple pregnancies, or uterine surgery are at higher risk for developing placenta previa. Prenatal care and regular monitoring can help detect and manage placenta previa to ensure the health and safety of both the mother and the baby.

    How to Treat Placenta Previa

    The treatment of placenta previa depends on the severity of the condition, the gestational age of the baby, and the mother's overall health. If a woman is diagnosed with placenta previa, she will likely need close monitoring and may need to be hospitalized, especially if she is experiencing bleeding.

    In some cases, if the placenta is located near the cervix but not completely covering it, the condition may resolve on its own as the uterus grows during pregnancy. However, if the placenta continues to cover the cervix, or if the woman experiences bleeding or other complications, treatment may include:

    Bed rest: Depending on the severity of the condition, a woman with placenta previa may need to remain on bed rest to avoid further complications.

    Medications: Medications may be used to help stop bleeding or prevent preterm labor.

    Delivery: If the condition is severe or if there is heavy bleeding, delivery via cesarean section may be necessary, even if it is before the due date.

    Blood transfusions: In severe cases of bleeding, a woman may need a blood transfusion to replace the blood she has lost.

    It is important to note that even with treatment, placenta previa can still lead to complications for both the mother and baby. Therefore, close monitoring by a healthcare provider is essential to ensure the best possible outcomes for both.

    Multidisciplinary Approach in the Treatment of Placenta Previa

    Due to the potential risks associated with placenta previa, a multidisciplinary approach is often used in the treatment of this condition. This approach involves a team of healthcare providers with different areas of expertise working together to manage the condition and provide the best possible care for the mother and baby.

    The multidisciplinary team may include:

    Obstetrician: An obstetrician is a doctor who specializes in the care of women during pregnancy, childbirth, and the postpartum period. The obstetrician will be responsible for managing the pregnancy and overseeing the delivery.

    Maternal-fetal medicine specialist: A maternal-fetal medicine specialist is a doctor who specializes in high-risk pregnancies. They can provide expert advice on the management of placenta previa and other complications.

    Neonatologist: A neonatologist is a doctor who specializes in the care of premature or critically ill newborns. If delivery occurs prematurely, a neonatologist may be needed to care for the baby.

    Anesthesiologist: An anesthesiologist is a doctor who specializes in administering anesthesia. They will be responsible for providing anesthesia during the delivery via cesarean section.

    Blood bank specialist: A blood bank specialist is a healthcare provider who manages the supply and distribution of blood products. In cases of severe bleeding, a blood bank specialist may be involved in providing blood transfusions.

    Radiologist: A radiologist is a doctor who specializes in medical imaging. They can provide expertise in interpreting ultrasound images to diagnose placenta previa.

    Nurses: Nurses are essential members of the healthcare team who provide care and support to the mother and baby during and after delivery.

    By working together, this multidisciplinary team can provide a comprehensive and coordinated approach to the management of placenta previa, ensuring the best possible outcomes for both the mother and baby.

    What Causes Placenta Accreta Spectrum Disease?

    Placenta accreta spectrum (PAS) is a pregnancy complication that occurs when the placenta grows too deeply into the uterine wall, sometimes even penetrating the muscle. The exact cause of PAS is not known, but there are several factors that are known to increase the risk of developing this condition.

    Some of the known risk factors for PAS include:

    Previous cesarean deliveries: Women who have had one or more previous cesarean deliveries are at higher risk for developing PAS. The scar tissue from the previous surgeries can make it difficult for the placenta to attach properly to the uterine wall.

    Placenta previa: Women who have placenta previa (when the placenta covers the cervix) are at increased risk for developing PAS.

    Advanced maternal age: Women who are older than 35 years of age at the time of delivery are at increased risk for developing PAS.

    Uterine surgery: Women who have had surgery on their uterus, such as a myomectomy (removal of uterine fibroids) or a uterine repair, are at increased risk for developing PAS.

    Asherman syndrome: Women who have Asherman syndrome (a condition in which scar tissue forms inside the uterus) are at increased risk for developing PAS.

    In vitro fertilization (IVF): Women who have undergone IVF are at increased risk for developing PAS.

    It is important to note that many women who develop PAS have no known risk factors. Pregnant women who are at increased risk for PAS should be closely monitored throughout pregnancy and delivery to ensure early detection and management of any complications.

    What are the Symptoms of Placenta Accreta?

    Placenta accreta spectrum (PAS) is a serious pregnancy complication that may not cause symptoms until delivery. However, there are some signs and symptoms that may indicate the presence of PAS, including:

    Abnormal vaginal bleeding: PAS may cause vaginal bleeding during pregnancy, labor, or delivery. The bleeding may be heavy or light, but it is usually painless.

    Decreased fetal movement: In some cases, PAS may cause decreased fetal movement. This may be due to reduced blood flow to the fetus.

    Uterine tenderness: Women with PAS may experience tenderness or discomfort in the uterus.

    Pelvic pain: Women with PAS may experience pelvic pain or discomfort.

    Anemia: Heavy bleeding from PAS can cause anemia (a deficiency of red blood cells).

    Abnormal fetal position: PAS may cause the baby to be in a breech (bottom-first) or transverse (sideways) position.

    Preterm labor: PAS may cause preterm labor (labor that occurs before 37 weeks of pregnancy).

    It is important to note that not all women with PAS will experience symptoms, and some symptoms may be due to other conditions. Pregnant women who are at increased risk for PAS should be closely monitored throughout pregnancy and delivery to ensure early detection and management of any complications.

    How is Placenta Accreta Diagnosed?

    Placenta accreta spectrum (PAS) is often difficult to diagnose because it may not cause any symptoms until delivery. However, there are several tests that can be used to diagnose PAS, including:

    Ultrasound: An ultrasound is a non-invasive imaging test that uses sound waves to create pictures of the inside of the body. A transvaginal ultrasound can be used to examine the placenta and the uterus and may reveal signs of PAS, such as placenta attachment to the muscle layer of the uterus.

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI): An MRI is a non-invasive imaging test that uses a strong magnetic field and radio waves to create detailed images of the inside of the body. An MRI may be used to diagnose PAS and to determine the extent of placenta invasion into the uterine wall.

    Doppler ultrasound: A Doppler ultrasound is a type of ultrasound that uses sound waves to measure blood flow. This test can be used to determine if the blood flow to the placenta is normal, which can help diagnose PAS.

    Blood tests: Blood tests may be used to monitor the mother's blood loss and to assess her blood clotting ability.

    Pelvic exam: A pelvic exam may be performed to check for signs of bleeding and to assess the position of the baby.

    If PAS is suspected, a team of healthcare providers will work together to develop a treatment plan that is tailored to the mother's specific needs. The goal of treatment is to minimize the risks to both the mother and the baby. In some cases, a cesarean delivery may be necessary to minimize the risk of bleeding and other complications.

    How is Placenta Treatment Performed?

    Placenta treatment is a medical procedure in which placental tissue or cells are used to treat various medical conditions. There are several different methods of placenta treatment, depending on the specific medical condition being treated.

    One common method of placenta treatment is placenta encapsulation. In this process, the placenta is cleaned, dehydrated, and ground into a fine powder. The powder is then placed into capsules and taken orally by the patient.

    Another method of placenta treatment is placenta injection. In this process, placental tissue or cells are injected into the patient's body. This method is often used to treat conditions such as joint pain or skin aging.

    Placenta cream or ointment is another method of placenta treatment. In this process, placental tissue or cells are processed into a cream or ointment and applied topically to the patient's skin. This method is often used to treat skin conditions such as eczema or psoriasis.

    It is important to note that while some people believe in the benefits of placenta treatment, there is limited scientific evidence to support its effectiveness. Additionally, placenta treatment carries some risks, including the risk of infection or allergic reaction. It is important to discuss any potential treatments with a qualified healthcare provider.

    The content of the page is for informational purposes only, please consult your doctor for diagnosis and treatment.

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    Approved by on 24.02.2023

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    About the Author

    Medical Editorial Board

    Medical Editorial Board

    Approved by on 24.02.2023