What Is Anaphylaxis? How To Treat It?
Emergency

What Is Anaphylaxis? How To Treat It?

    What Is Anaphylaxis? How To Treat It?

    Anaphylaxis is a severe allergic reaction that causes swelling of the throat, tongue, lips, face, or other parts of the body.

    Anaphylaxis is an acute life threatening condition that requires immediate medical attention. It can occur in people with allergies to food, insect stings, medications, latex, or other substances.

     

    Learn what it is, how to treat it, and when to seek medical attention

    Anaphylaxis occurs when the immune system reacts to something called an antigen (a substance that triggers an immune response). This happens because the immune system has been sensitized by previous exposure to the antigen. If the immune system encounters the same antigen again, it will react quickly and cause symptoms such as hives, itching, wheezing, shortness of breath, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, and fainting.

     

    What Is Anaphylactic Shock?

    Anaphylactic shock is a life-threatening condition caused by an allergic reaction. People who suffer from anaphylactic shock often need emergency treatment right away.

     

    Symptoms Of Anaphylaxis

    If you think you might be suffering from anaphylaxis, seek medical attention immediately. You should also carry an EpiPen with you at all times. This device contains epinephrine, which will help stop the symptoms of anaphylaxis.

     

    Causes And Risk Factors For Anaphylaxis

    Anaphylaxis occurs when the immune system reacts to allergens by releasing chemicals called histamines. Histamine triggers the release of fluid into tissues, causing them to swell. In some cases, these swollen tissues block airways and cause breathing difficulties.

     

    Treatment Options

    If you suspect that you or someone else has an allergy, you should seek medical attention immediately. This includes calling 112 if needed. You should also carry an EpiPen with you at all times.

    The content of the page is for informational purposes only, please consult your doctor for diagnosis and treatment.