What is LASIK Eye Surgery?
Ophthalmology

What is LASIK Eye Surgery?

    LASIK (laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis), is a surgical procedure used to correct refractive errors in the eyes, such as nearsightedness, farsightedness, and astigmatism, that may require the use of glasses or contact lenses. During this procedure, a laser is used to reshape the cornea, the clear front surface of the eye, to improve its focusing ability. LASIK surgery typically takes only a few minutes per eye and does not require general anesthesia. After the surgery, there may be some discomfort and redness in the eyes for a few hours, but this usually subsides within a few days. LASIK surgery can reduce or eliminate the need for glasses or contact lenses.

    Why is LASIK Eye Surgery Performed?

    LASIK eye surgery is performed to correct refractive errors in the eyes. Refractive errors are conditions that cause a disruption in the eye's focusing ability, requiring the use of glasses or contact lenses. These include:

    • • Myopia (nearsightedness): Occurs when the eyes are shorter than normal, necessitating glasses to achieve proper focus.
    • • Hyperopia (farsightedness): Occurs when the eyes are longer than normal, requiring glasses for clear focus.
    • • Astigmatism: Caused by a distortion in the cornea or lens, preventing the eyes from focusing properly. In this case, glasses or contact lenses are needed.

    LASIK surgery is performed to correct these refractive errors and thereby reduce or eliminate the need for glasses or contact lenses. Additionally, LASIK surgery can help decrease or eliminate the use of contact lenses altogether.

    How is LASIK Eye Surgery Performed?

    LASIK eye surgery is performed using a laser, and typically does not involve the use of a surgical blade, nor does it usually require general anesthesia. The surgery involves the following steps:

    1. The eyes are cleaned, and a sterile strip is applied to keep the eyes open and prevent them from moving during the procedure.
    2. The top layer of the cornea, known as the epithelium, is cut using a laser to create a flap. This flap will be lifted and folded back to provide access to the inner layers of the cornea.
    3. A laser is used to reshape the cornea, correcting its focusing ability and addressing any refractive errors in the eye.
    4. The corneal flap is carefully repositioned back in place, and it adheres naturally without the need for stitches.

    After the surgery, there may be some discomfort and redness in the eyes, which typically lasts for a few hours. This discomfort usually subsides within a few days. Some individuals may experience mild itching or burning in their eyes after the procedure, but this is usually temporary.

    LASIK surgery generally takes only a few minutes per eye, and the recovery period is relatively quick. It can reduce or eliminate the need for glasses or contact lenses, providing clearer vision for many individuals.

    In Which Eye Conditions is LASIK Surgery Applied?

    • LASIK eye surgery is performed to correct refractive errors in the eyes, such as myopia (nearsightedness), hyperopia (farsightedness), and astigmatism. These errors are conditions that disrupt the eye's focusing ability and require the use of glasses or contact lenses.

    • • Additionally, LASIK surgery can help reduce or eliminate the use of contact lenses. This procedure is suitable for individuals who are at least 18 years old and have had stable refractive errors in their eyes for a certain period (usually a few years).
    • • LASIK surgery can also be used to correct presbyopia (age-related loss of near vision) or other refractive errors in the eyes. However, it is advisable to consider other eye surgery options for these conditions.

    • To determine the suitability of LASIK surgery, an eye doctor must conduct an examination and measure the refractive errors in the eyes. LASIK surgery may not be suitable for everyone, and evaluating other eye surgery options is recommended.

    Who Cannot Have LASIK Eye Surgery?

    LASIK eye surgery may not be suitable for everyone, and it may not be recommended for certain individuals. For example:

    • Pregnant and nursing women: LASIK surgery may not be recommended during pregnancy and nursing because hormonal changes during these periods can cause fluctuations in refractive errors in the eyes.

    • • Elderly individuals: LASIK surgery may not be suitable for correcting refractive errors related to age-related vision loss, such as presbyopia. Considering other eye surgery options is advisable in such cases.
    • • Individuals with significant refractive errors: If you have significant refractive errors in your eyes, LASIK surgery may not be fully effective, and evaluating other eye surgery options is recommended.
    • • Individuals with very mild refractive errors: If you have very mild refractive errors in your eyes, LASIK surgery may be unnecessary, and other methods could be preferred.
    • • Individuals with fluctuating refractive errors: If your refractive errors in the eyes frequently change, the effectiveness of LASIK surgery may be reduced, and considering other eye surgery options is advisable.

    • Individuals with other eye health issues: If you have other eye health problems, LASIK surgery may not be suitable, and evaluating other eye surgery options is recommended.

    How is Suitability Assessed Before LASIK Eye Surgery?

    Before LASIK eye surgery, an eye doctor conducts an examination and measures the refractive errors in the eyes. This examination is performed to determine the degree and type of refractive errors in the eyes. This information helps assess the suitability of the surgery.

    • Prior to LASIK surgery, the presence of any other eye health issues is also evaluated. For instance, inflammatory diseases, eye injuries, or other abnormalities in the eyes can prevent the application of LASIK surgery.
    • Before LASIK surgery, the stability of refractive errors in the eyes is also assessed. If your refractive errors frequently change, the effectiveness of LASIK surgery may be reduced, and considering other eye surgery options is advisable.

    Additionally, the degree of refractive errors in the eyes is also evaluated before LASIK surgery.

    The content of the page is for informational purposes only, please consult your doctor for diagnosis and treatment.